Journeys Beyond the Past

Updated: 2 days ago


The book events centred around Sesonsfin have commenced, the next one at time of writing being in Buckfastleigh, Devon, at the appropriately-named Dragon Sanctuary. This is quickly proving my most popular book. Its themes of severe climate change and socio-economic collapse may very well be tapping into the zeitgeist, but I think it's more than that. For Sesonsfin offers an insight into spiritual practices that have pretty much been forgotten, practices that show a transcendence of the physical environment, an upliftment, yet deeply rooted in pragmatism rather than dogma.


The joke, known only to myself hitherto, is that in this series of seven novellas, a later, unwritten one features a scene in the future where teenagers are discussing their chosen careers, the twist being that none of these careers exist in our current world. One of those careers is that of psyarchaeology, which is a blend of empirical scientific evidence with intuitive, visionary revelations. During the first lockdown I found myself stranded in Wiltshire in ideal circumstances to write and explore the landscape. The second book was Sesonsfin. I had ordered many books on Bronze Age archaeology, and found that by focusing so much on the subject I started experiencing vivid dreams at night and clear visions during meditation. It was like I was actually experiencing life in Late Bronze Age Britain. I had become a temporary psyarchaeologist.


A lot of archaeological mysteries started making sense, such as the avid building of wooden posts at times of lunar eclipses, the breaking of objects in burial sites and the reverence for water. This latter in particular had many fascinating aspects. During that dry summer of lockdown in Wiltshire, I realised there were few water sources where I was - and I saw in visions assigned Water Carriers performing their sacred duty by ensuring water was always with the tribe as they moved around the landscape. In flooded plains such as those surrounding Avelon (a Cornish word), their task was unnecessary and, unburdened, they would be even more grateful than their companions for the abundance of that sacred element.


There is more, much more, and I find I have so much material that these book events are packed full of interesting and revelatory information. I did manage to get most of this into the book itself, but these events help me go further with the explorations and share with others what is so important and significant about a culture that we consider to be of the past but has plenty to offer for the future. And of course, one of the basic tenets of this timeless culture is that it is, in fact, timeless.






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